Neoscona crucifera – Spotted Orb Weaver

Neoscona crucifera, commonly known as the spotted orbweaver, is an orb weaver species indigenous to the Eastern part of North America.

Description of the spotted orb weaver

The abdomen, which is usually a shade of brown or reddish brown, has a slight pattern but nothing that stands out, and is usually covered with thick hairs. The legs will have brown or red-brown coloring closer to the body and have black and white / tan bands on the half furthest away from the cephalothorax.

Neoscona crucifera - Spotted Orbweaver
A male spotted orbweaver. Photography by: Randy Richardson – Flat Rock, Michigan

In Texas, Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico, the range of the spotted orb weaver overlaps with the western spotted orb weaver (Neoscona oaxacensis). Most of the time, these two species can be distinguished. However, since the western spotted orb weaver can take on various appearances, it might look similar to Neoscona crucifera. Both of these spiders are not medically significant.

Size

The body of the female adult will grow to ¾ of an inch (19 mm). If you include the legs, they can reach around 1 ½ inches (38 mm).

Web

As any orb weaver, the spotted orb weaver spins webs to catch small insects. The web is orb-shaped and is rebuild every day.

A more lightly colored spotted orb weaver found by Marc.

Bite

The spotted orb weaver is not an aggressive spider. However, in some situations, it occurs that it bites a human or a pet. The symptoms are usually comparable with a bee sting and will not have any long term negative effects.

Neoscona Crucifera spotted orb weaver female brown orange beige colors found in New Jersey
A spotted orb weaver found by Maria in Rahway, New Jersey

Neoscona crucifera scientific classification

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Subphylum: Chelicerata
  • Class: Arachnida
  • Order: Araneae
  • Infraorder: Araneomorphae
  • Family: Aranidae
  • Genus: Neoscona
  • Species: Neoscona crucifera

Common Names

Most commonly, Neoscona crucifera are called spotted orbweavers. Other common names are Hentz orbweaver and barn spider.

Distribution of spotted orbweavers in the USA

Neoscona crucifera – Spotted Orb Weaver range

The spotted orbweaver appears in the eastern United States. It is commonly found all over the east coast, to Minnesota in the north and until eastern Arizona in the South. The spotted orb weaver can be found in the following states: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin.

Spotted orb-weaver reader images

Below is an image gallery of the numerous photos of spotted orbweavers that our readers have shared with us

Neoscona crucifera – Spotted Orb Weaver

28 thoughts on “Neoscona crucifera – Spotted Orb Weaver

  1. This spider is making a web on the outside of my window in Hedgesville, WV. Beautiful Halloween-perfect web about 2 feet in diameter.

    1. Hello Connor, thanks for sharing this great shot! Yes, you’ve come to the right page – this is Neoscona crucifera.

  2. Found this beauty outside my back door in a suburb of St. Louis, MO. Tried using your identification tools, and I’m assuming it’s some species of an Orb spider, but couldn’t land on the same back markings.
    His underside has two closely spaced white dots. I’ll try to upload that pic in another reply. Thank you!

  3. I found this spider outside my window and they are larger than 3 and 1/2 inches big. It is a brown-clear color and has a yellow,white, and Black underside.

  4. This is one of two large spiders that has set up shop near the lights at the front door. This is the smaller of the two, the colors are not as vivid, and it looks like a cross on the body.

  5. I found this one in Indianapolis, IN. It’s brown and black, with alternating colored bands on the legs, and hairs on both the body and legs. The body is approximately 3/8 to 1/2 inch long with a spade-shaped rear and two small points near the front. There was no accompanying web that I could see, but I saw it in mid-air, then it quickly ran up a single strand of webbing when I approached.

  6. Saw this spider on a plant in my garden. I live in Sanford, NC.
    Fairly uniform in color. Hairy. Body about the size of a dime.

  7. Based on other pictures,I believe this is a Neoscona crucifera. She’s currently taken up residence outside my window in Atlanta, GA.

  8. My daughters and I found this beauty on our recycling bin. I think it’s a female spotted orb weaver? Is that right? She’s pretty!

  9. Hello! Found this guest under the ceiling of my porch. I’m in eastern North Carolina, in the mountains. I can’t tell if it’s a spotted or a red-femured orbweaver. What do you think?

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