Identified Spiders

211 thoughts on “Identified Spiders

  1. Pinky finger tip sized, pattern similar to spitting spider but body shaped like false widow. Spider appears almost black without flash from camera revealing the pattern.

    1. Hello Robin,
      Thanks for reaching out. Do you also have a dorsal shot of the spider? It’s hard to make out the patterns on the back of the spider. At first glance and given the size, this might be some type of Lyniiphidae spider. It could be a Sheetweb Spider (Drapetisca alteranda). Check out the pictures and information on this site for your reference:
      http://www.cirrusimage.com/spider_Sheetweb_D_alteranda.htm

    1. Hello Sandy, thanks for getting in touch! This is most likely a garden ghost spider (Hibana gracilis).

  2. This spider was crawling on my bed in Greensburg, Pennsylvania. I took it outside where I got this quick photo. I hope it is enough to identify it. I’ve never seen anything like it. I hope it is a friendly one!

    1. Hi Mandy, thanks for getting in touch! This is a garden ghost spider (Hibana gracilis). It’s a friendly one 🙂 you or your pets don’t have to fear it. Its bite is no worse than a bee sting and its usually not aggressive.
      We don’t have an overview about this species here yet, but you can find more photos here on bugguide: https://bugguide.net/node/view/240115

  3. Medium sized black/brown spider with tan? Markings on abdomen. Has spinners and is hairy. Found indoors in a basement in Western Massachusetts, USA. Photos taken in a small terrarium used to contain it until identification (it seems to have started to spin a small white spot on the head of the rubber duck, and I believe it has interest in the gnats living in my moss. No signs of aggression or attempts to jump/climb out. I think it may be a black lace weaver but am unsure.

    1. Hello Hannah, this is some type of ground spider (Gnaphosidae sp.) but I can’t say for certain what species. It might be of the genus Scotophaeus but I can’t say for certain.

  4. Found black spider crawling across kitchen floor . Body was about one inch long. Body and legs about 1.5 inches long. Northern Virginia.

    1. Hello Sam, thanks for getting in touch! I can’t say for certain what species this is. It’s definitely not one of the medically significant spiders found in the U.S. I think this is some type of ground spider (Gnaphosidae).

  5. Find these guys on my walls or ceilings, usually up pretty high. Sometimes I find dead ones that my cats may have bullied to death. Leg span is roughly 4 or 5 inches. Don’t think they are poisonous but curious what these spider friends are all about.

    1. Hello MK, thanks for getting in touch! This is some type of huntsman spider. It is most likely a Heteropoda venatoria, assuming it was found somewhere in the Gulf States or California.

  6. Sorry, it’s a little blurry on account if all the screaming shaking the camera. Found in southern CA, about an inch long including legs.

  7. This spider sat on our tarp in a grassy area next to the woods. There were several large spiders but none like this one.

    1. Hello Eric, thanks for reaching out! Unfortunately, I can’t seem to locate the spider itself on the picture. The orb web clearly indicates that it was built by an orb weaving spider (Aranidae). The missing sector on the left bottom could indicate that you are looking at a missing-sector orb weaver – but that is simply speculation, the web might still be under construction.
      Here is an overview of the most common orb weavers in the U.S.: https://usaspiders.com/orb-weaver/
      Here is a link to our detail page of the missing-sector orb weaver: https://usaspiders.com/missing-sector-orb-weaver-zygiella-x-notata/

  8. Very small spider, found it at my job here in Central Wisconsin. Probably the size of the nail on my ring finger. To the human eye it’s very black with a single red line on it’s back on the cepholothorax. Up close you can kinda see it’s more brown than red and extends to the legs.

  9. Hello Jennifer, thanks for uploading these pictures. I can’t say anything for certain, but this looks more like the molt of a spider than an actual dead spider. The abdomen seems to be missing almost completely. The shape and appearance of the cephalothorax suggests that this might be some type of trapdoor spider: https://usaspiders.com/ummidia-trap-door-spider/

  10. Can you identify this spider? The seek app was unable to and so was your identifier.
    It was very small and moved like a jumping spider.

    1. Hello Kim, this is probably some type of huntsman spider (family Sparassidae). They are not medically significant and generally not aggressive.

    1. Hello Hannalie, thanks for getting in touch! It’s hard to make out the details of the spider’s body on the photo. There are a couple of spiders in the U.S. with a black body and red legs (none of them are medically significant). My best guess would be that this is a red-legged purseweb spider (Sphodros rufipes): https://bugguide.net/node/view/140108
      Let me know if your spider did not look like this one.

  11. Found at a city park in southern Wisconsin on a railing over a small creek—lots of tall grasses and trees. The long forearms are surprising but it doesn’t appear to be a pseudoscorpion.

    1. Hello Gina, thanks for getting in touch! What a great find! You are right, this is not a pseudoscorpion – it’s a jumping spider. More specifically, a white-jawed jumping spider (Hentzia mitrata): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hentzia_mitrata
      We don’t have a detail page for this spider yet but we will create one now that we have an image. Thank you!

  12. Found this outside on the back porch behind a planter. Was about 1” body length at least. Not hairy. Black body and reddish legs. Found in Poulsbo, Washington.

  13. Found crawling in my hope, probably 1 cm long total. It might be hard to tell from the photo (sorry, it was moving a lot and my camera isn’t great) but some of the legs had really clear color banding. The main body was brownish and the abdomen had black and white stripes in what looked like complete bands. I think that thing on the end of its abdomen was spinnerets? North Richland Hills, Texas 2 AM.

  14. was cleaning the side of my unit…this was in one of the crawl space vents. My unit is next to a greenbelt area on the Tacoma-Puyallup border in Washington State.

    1. Hello Leslie, thanks for getting in touch! This is a ground spider (family: Gnaphosidae). Probably of the genus Zelotes. It is not medically significant.

  15. Little bitty guy, talking pinky nail if sprawled out. Not seen one of these before. We’re in Indiana, USA.

    He’s very front heavy looking, very hairy legs too. Super skittish, released him quickly outside as he seemed scared.

  16. This spider was on my outside wall 2 nights in a row. Only saw it at night. Last sighting it was sticking out of a vent like it was going inside as the sun came up. It stays still for very long periods of time. I estimate it’s size, (based on spider size compared to the bricks):
    body length: ~1.15″
    w legs: ~2.9″
    Tim
    Livonia, MI
    (last photo)

  17. Fat yellow body with tiny black spots. Transparent legs. Found on fence post on the South Shore of Lake Superior in Michigan at Little Girls Point.

  18. Found in house (bathroom) in Minnesota. I believe the body was less than 1 cm. Dark brown/black body with a cream/gray stripe on its abdomen. Legs are dark brown/black and brown/reddish brown striped. Didn’t look hairy and I didn’t see any visible spinnerets.
    I have a few more photos if it helps ID him. Thanks!

    1. Hello Brent, thanks for uploading this interesting find! This is a noble false widow, Steatoda nobilis. It was originally native to the Canary Islands and Madeira but has been introduced to California via the UK, where the spider has established large populations. The spider is a close relative of the black widow but it is not considered medically significant (however, it can deliver a painful bite). You can find some more pictures and information here: https://bugguide.net/node/view/697702

  19. Found this tiny guy in my porch. Central MN. He was making a web I couldn’t see. About the size of an ant. Orangish red body with a black spot on its butt and black legs.

    1. Hello Elizabeth, thanks for getting in touch! This is a tough one 🙂 I’m fairly certain that this is some type of cobweb spider of the family Theridiidae – it’s definitely not a medically significant spiders. There are numerous spiders in that family in the U.S. but I assume this could be of the genus Thymoites: https://bugguide.net/node/view/49091

  20. Couldn’t seem to find a match… this was on our fan palm tree with a body about the size of a nickel or maybe even a quarter.

    1. Hello Matt, thanks for getting in touch! Would you mind sharing where you found this spider?
      It’s definitely a male orb weaver, which are not medically significant. The exact species level identification is tough, but it could be Araneus saevus: https://bugguide.net/node/view/1906067

  21. Found this on my window in Coral Springs, FL and there was another one, the same shape just much smaller and more yellow in color.

  22. Fairly small spider with gray body, reddish/brown bands, and black head with white mark.
    San Antonio, TX

  23. Found in central Texas. Its a jumping spider but the markings don’t match any results I’ve found

    1. Hello G, thanks for reaching out. This is definitely a jumping spider. Most likely, a spider of the genus Marpissa (either Marpissa formosa or Marpissa bina). It’s not medically significant.

  24. This tiny spider was sitting on my car door this morning. I was parked under a tree in a state park near Madison, Wisconsin (7/18/211.) The grainy-looking background is the fancy paint job on the car.

    1. Hello EK, thanks for getting in touch and for uploading this great shot! This is a long-jawed orb weaver of the genus Tetragnatha. It’s not a medically significant spider.

  25. Crawling on my arm the other day in Sherman (north) Texas. Near the pool. About the size of a dime in total.

    1. Hello Jennifer, thanks for getting in touch! Interesting find! This looks like a male Metacyrba floridiana jumping spider – it’s not a very common spider so it doesn’t have a cool common name to go with. It’s not medically significant. Here are some other pictures and confirmation that this species occurs in North Carolina: https://bugguide.net/node/view/1562095/bgpage

  26. Found this guy crawling across the floor in my basement in Western Massachusetts. His body may have been 0.5”+. No web.

    1. Hello Jennifer, I am not really sure on the ID of this spider. I’ve asked around and was told it might be a female cave orb weaver (Meta ovalis) but I am not really sure about that. It might also be some type of cobweb spider (Theridiidae). Let us know if you get another look at this spider or its web. More pictures would definitely help to get a positive ID on this girl. It’s definitely not a medically significant spider.

  27. I live in New Jersey Just south of Trenton, we found this this afternoon on one of our curtains. The curtain is brown itself and the only reason we saw it was because of the white spots on its abdomen. I took a much cleaner front shot but figured this angle showed the markings more. I can upload the others if needed, thank you!

    1. Hello John, thanks for getting in touch! I have an idea of what it might be but it would be great if you could also upload the front shot. Thanks!

  28. Found on a hike at Round Lakes, near Park Falls, Wisconsin. Thorax and head are at least an inch long, attempts to use finger/hand for scale dissuaded by aggressive response.

  29. Found on a hike at Round Lakes, near Park Falls, Wisconsin. Thorax and head are at least an inch long, attempts to use finger/hand for scale dissuaded by aggressive response. (2/2)

    1. Hello Alden, thanks for getting in touch! This is a female Araneus saevus, one of the orb weaver spiders. It’s not medically significant.

  30. Found in Charleston, South Carolina. There is also a smaller, similar shaped spider on the same plant, so I believe male and female with an egg sac?

  31. Hi David, thanks for getting in touch. Unfortunately, it’s not really possible to see any details of the spider on the picture. The posture and size of the spider looks a lot like a wolf spider: https://usaspiders.com/lycosidae-wolf-spider/
    It’s definitely not one of the medically significant spiders that occur in the U.S.

  32. We have had black widows here in our area, but this guy just walked through my living room. Very small and no markings. Just a deep black.

    1. Hello Ely, thanks for getting in touch! Could you please share your location to help with the identification? Was the spider entirely black or did it have some lighter markings? The shape doesn’t look like a black widow, it reminds me of a spitting spider: https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Scytodes-globula-displaying-approach-and-contact-leg-see-Table-1-with-the_fig1_262090870
      It could also be some other ant mimic spider – the location would help to narrow the options down.

  33. Found in the dirt at a job I was working at in central Washington state. It seemd to want to burrow underground.

    1. Hello Blaine, thanks for getting in touch! What a great find and picture! This is a female trapdoor spider. They spend almost their entire life buried underground and are rarely seen. They are not medically significant.
      There is a wide range of similar-looking trapdoor species but it could be a spider of the genus Antrodiaetus: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antrodiaetus

  34. Was a difficult spot to get a good photo. After looking at the link that you sent, I would be inclined to agree. Thank you for you help!.

  35. I found this little guy making a home along the lip created from the toilet tank lid. He had made a web along the whole front edge( fine and shear, not obvious genometry, but also not obviously erratic) and had connected to the handle as well a bit. I also catch and release spiders I find in my home, but it makes it even more fun to know what they are. Usually I find baby/small spiders so that makes it a bit harder to identify.
    Thanks for the fun informative site/community!

    1. Hello Elora, thanks for getting in touch! This is most likely some type of sheetweb or money spider (family Linyphiidae).

  36. Oakesdale, WA. Picture taken outdoors, up close with a flash at nighttime. Scurried across my front porch; I took the pic where it briefly stopped, and then it hunkered down at the base of a plant just beyond the porch where I left it alone. I am thinking trapdoor spider based on the info on this site, but the hairy legs seemed a bit different. It was on the large side, which is why it caught my attention. About the size of a 50-cent piece with its legs out like this.

  37. I know this is a jumping spider but I’m mystified asto what kind. The dark area on its head was iridescent green. It was found in Troy, Virginia. I will upload a second view of the spider.

    1. Hello Grace, thanks for getting in touch! This is an emerald jumping spider (Paraphidippus aurantius): https://bugguide.net/node/view/1549696
      Great photos and a great find! We will create an overview article about it soon. Can we use your pictures by crediting you as Grace from Troy, Virginia?

    1. Hello Caitlin, this appears to be some type of widow spider (genus Latrodectus) due to the red hourglass marking on its underside. Given the coloration and your location, it could be a brown widow (Latrodectus geometricus) or a juvenile western black widow (Latrodectus hesperus). Here are articles about both species:
      https://usaspiders.com/latrodectus-geometricus-brown-widow/
      https://usaspiders.com/latrodectus-hesperus-western-black-widow/
      Western black widows are considered medically significant. It’s best to handle her with care.

  38. Hello Kim, this is some male funnel-weaving spider of the family Agelenidae. It might be a barn funnel weaver (Tegenaria domestica) or possibly also a grass spider (Agelenopsis sp.). It’s not a medically significant spider.

  39. Hello Kandace, thanks for getting in touch! It’s a bit hard to identify the details and eye pattern ofthe spider so I can’t give an ID with certainty. My best guess is that this is some male funnel-weaving spider of the family Agelenidae. It might be a barn funnel weaver (Tegenaria domestica) or possibly also a grass spider (Agelenopsis sp.). It may even be some type of wolf spider. It’s definitely not a medically significant spider.

  40. Hello Emily, thanks for getting in touch! This is probably a Chilean tiger spider (Sytodes globula). A type of spitting spider that has been introduced to the Southeastern U.S. from South America. It’s not a medically significant spider. This one seems to have been through some struggles as it is missing two legs.
    https://bugguide.net/node/view/1921303
    Here is our overview of a closely related North American spitting spider:
    https://usaspiders.com/scytodes-thoracica-spitting-spider/

  41. Hello Nate, thanks for getting in touch! It looks like this fellow has been dead for some time and is quite desiccated, which makes identification harder. However, I am fairly certain that this some type of male false widow spider (genus Steatoda). They are not medically significant spiders.

  42. I was just hanging out at Barnes and Noble in Phoenix, Arizona when this brown spider suddenly approached my foot. I was then curious as to what species this spider is and want to make sure if it is a brown recluse spider or not. Thank you!

    1. Hello Tommy, thanks for getting in touch! Unfortunately, I am unable to clearly see the body of the spider on the image to make a definitive identification. But given the coloration and posture, it might be a brown recluse. Do you have any more pictures?

      1. Sadly that’s the only one I took. I got too nervous to get closer since I don’t know what kind of spider it is so I tired my best to take a good picture at a good distance.

  43. I found this spider in a bathroom in Oregon. It is a burgundy brown color and has some lighter markings on it. It was hairy and the body was around an inch long. I managed to take it outside without it attempting to jump or anything. I’ve never seen a spider like this before and would love to know what it was!

    1. Hello Monique, this is some type of hacklemesh weaver (family Amaruobiidae). They are not medically significant.

  44. Hi James, thanks for uploading this great shot! Unfortunately, I can’t ID the spider with certainty off this picture alone. It might be some type of longjawed orbweaver (Tetragnatha sp.) or a net-casting spider (Deinopis sp.). Here is a Deinopis sp. in a similar body posture: https://bugguide.net/node/view/26252/bgpage

  45. Hi Alan, I can’t say for certain what species this is as I can’t make out any details of the spider on the picture. My guess is that this is a white-banded fishing spider (Dolomedes albineus).

  46. Any idea what this little guy is? He’s very about half an inch long including legs. The web is very fine and goes from the bottom of the cabinet to the floor for around 4ft. It almost looks like a bunch of crystal structures going across the front and deep. Pretty cool, reminds me of bonds in chemistry.

  47. Hello Jaquelyn, thanks for uploading this shot! This is some type of orbweaving spider in the genus Araneus. Given the range and patterns, it could possibly be A. corticarius of A. nordmanni.

  48. Hello Joseph, thanks for getting in touch! This is definitely some type of cobweb spider. I am fairly certain that it belongs to the genus Steatoda. There is a small chance that it is a juvenile western black widow – that would also depend on your location in the U.S. and is very unlikely based on the appearance of the spider on the photo.

  49. I turned over a piece of metal in my yard and discovered 8 of these, all about the size of a quarter to a fifty cent piece. Seven of these ran away, all similar to the 1st and 3rd images (Left to Right). After a few moments they all tried to come back, but when provoked would try to hide, except the 8th, which is the 2nd image. When provoked it stood it’s ground, but was confrontational. That’s when I noticed it was sheltering a baby. Due to it’s different markings I’m assuming is was the opposite sex of the others. I didn’t want to massacre a family, so I put the metal piece back. What are they?

  50. Saw this spider on the floor of my deck. Was about the size of a penny including the legs. I live in a heavily wooded neighborhood. The spider was a very slow crawler. No clue what it might be.
    Ellicott City, Maryland

    1. Hello Hunter, thanks for getting in touch and for sharing this great find! This is a bolas spider (Mastophora sp.). They are part of the orbweaver family but instead of spinning webs, they place a drop of sticky liquid at the end of a silk strand and swing it at flying moths. They produce pheromones to attract moths.
      Here is more information on Wikiepdia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bolas_spider

  51. The bright color caught our eyes on a walk in our North Attleboro, MA neighborhood. It was in a fence post. Seemed all one color throughout whole body, including legs. Main body was about the size of an adult pinky fingernail.

  52. Hello Mayra, thanks for getting in touch! The spiders you have found are cobweb spiders of the genus Steatoda. Possibly Steatoda triangulosa or Steatoda grossa.
    These spiders are called false widow spiders due to their similar appearance as widows but they are not medically significant.
    https://usaspiders.com/theridiidae/steatoda/

  53. I found this on my kitchen counter this morning. We are in the North Carolina mountains. There are lots of spiders here but I have not seen one like this. Since there were bananas nearby on the counter I wondered if it hitchhiked from the country of origin.

    1. Hello Jeff, thanks for getting in touch! This is indeed a local spider. It’s a type of crab spider which usually hides in flowers and preys on pollinating insects. There is a number of genera that can look very similar but in this case I am fairly certain that this is Misumenoides formosipes, a whitebanded crab spider. Spiders of the genus Misumena look and behave very similarly. Here is an article with information about Misumena: https://usaspiders.com/misumena-vatia-flower-crab-spider/

  54. I discovered this spider outside my greenhouse at nights in Central Oregon. Maybe 1.5 inch across from leg to leg. I used the identification tool and it suggested hobo spider but looked quite different to me from the sample photo. What do you think?

    1. Hello Maxwell, thanks for getting in touch! No, this is not a hobo spider – the tool helps out often, but it’s far from perfect. We are constantly adding functionalities and more spider species.
      You found a rather uncommon spider. It’s a folding door spider of the genus Antrodiaetus. Here is a similar-looking fellow on Bugguide: https://bugguide.net/node/view/625550/bgimage
      It’s not a medically significant spider.

  55. Hi Kathy, this is a spotted orb weaver (Neoscona crucifera). The roundness and size of its abdomen suggest that it is pregnant. Orbweaver spiders only live for one season. They will lay eggs in late summer and die after that or usually at latest with the first frost. The spiderlings will hatch and spend the winter somewhere sheltered or remain inside the egg sacs throughout the colder months. Here is more information about it: https://usaspiders.com/neoscona-crucifera-spotted-orb-weaver/

  56. Hello Rebecca, thanks for getting in touch! This is some type of spotted orb weaver of the genus Neoscona. Given the color and your location, it could be a brown sailor spider (Neoscona nautica). It looks similar to this lady: https://spiderid.com/picture/4046/
    It’s definitely not a medically significant spider.

  57. Hello Donna, thanks for getting in touch! This is some type of jumping spider (family Salticidae). It’s not possible to make an exact species level ID off this picture as there are hundreds of spiders in that family. None of them are medically significant. To learn more about them, you can read through our overview for the bold jumper (Phidippus audax): https://usaspiders.com/phidippus-audax-daring-jumping-spider/
    Your spider may be P. audax but it could also be a related species.

    1. Hello Michael, nice find! This is Meriola decepta. It’s not a very common spider and therefore doesn’t have a fancy common name. It’s not a medically significant spider.

  58. Found in Spokane, WA… she was walking into the doorway of the house, from a pine forest. Didn’t see the web. Grabbed her by a kleenix and moved her back outside.

    1. I see someone named Colleen also posted today that she found something similar in her basement in Spokane. Now I REALLY want to know what this spider is!!

  59. This little beauty is bigger than most jumping spiders I see, about 5 – 7mm. The closest I can find it Red-Backed Jumping Spider but the coloration is a bit different. It was at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens so may have come in on a plant if not usually found in the area.
    The following post has a picture of the back.

    Jumping-Spider_IMG_6060-2048-wm

    1. Hello Rebecca, thanks for getting in touch! And thanks for sharing these incredible shots! This is most likely a female emerald jumping spider (Paraphidippus aurantius). Here is a similar looking lady on bugguide: https://bugguide.net/node/view/2357
      The white spots on the back and missing black hairs above the eyes rule out Phidippus.
      May we use these photos on our site and credit you as the original photographer?

  60. I keep finding these in a cabin in Carnation, Washington. They are about an inch maybe larger, reddish brown and have some faint markings on the body back. What kind of spider is this?

    1. Hello Tamra, thanks for getting in touch! This is a hacklemesh weaver of the family Amaurobiidae. Possibly Callobius sp. It’s not a medically significant spider.

    1. Hello Kat, nice find! This is a joro spider (Trichonephila claviata). It’s a spider from Asia that has been introduced to the United States. In what state are you located? So far, we are only aware of populations in Georgia. It’s not a medically significant spider.

  61. Hello Amanda, thanks for getting in touch! This is actually a spider I have never seen before and had to ask some experts for advice. This is a cobweb spider in the genus Tidarren: https://bugguide.net/node/view/42448
    They are not medically significant. While brown widows can also have a quite dark appearance at times, they have fewer leg bands than common house spiders or this specimen. Also, brown widows are not considered medically significant because they are only able to inject a considerably smaller amount of venom with a bite than a female black widow.

  62. Eastern shore, lake Ontario, northern New York. For now, it is happily spinning as a studio spider, unless it violates the accord (lands on my head) or I’m told its dangerous. Then, it will have to find a home elsewhere.

    1. Hello TJ, thanks for getting in touch! This is a male furrow spider (Larinioides sp.). I can’t really tell if it is Larinioides sclopetarius or Larinioides patagiatus. It’s not a medically significant spider.

  63. Hello Robert, thanks for sharing this find. Unfortunately, it’s not really possible to see any details on the picture. Something about the general appearance and shape tells me that this might be some type of giant crab spider, possible Olios sp.: https://usaspiders.com/olios-giganteus-giant-crab-spider/
    But I can’t be certain about it. It’s definitely not one of the medically significant spiders found in the U.S.

  64. Hi, I took this picture earlier in the summer but haven’t been able to determine the type of spider it is. Found in Lynnwood, Washington (about 20 minutes north of Seattle). Was doing some gardening and shifted a tarp and there it was. Thanks in advance!

  65. I found this spider on my compost container after trimming bougainvillea in Northridge, California.
    It’s a small spider about the size of a dime.
    I found the stripped legs and red abdomen were interesting.
    I was able to relocate him to my garden.
    Could you help me identify the family it belongs to

    1. Hello Katkar, this is a jumping spider of the genus Phidippus. It might be Phidippus adumbratus, but I can’t say that for certain.

  66. Hello Adrienne, thanks for getting in touch! This is definitely not some kind of recluse spider – the body shape and posture don’t fit. I can’t say for certain what species it is since it’s not possible to make out any details such as eyes on the picture – and I am not an expert about spiders in Mexico. However, I am fairly certain that this is some type of giant crab spider (Sparassidae family)

    1. Hello Debbie, thanks for getting in touch! This is a bolas spider (Mastophora sp.). They are part of the orbweaver family but don’t spin webs to catch prey. They only spin a single strand of silk with a sticky droplet at the end. They swirl that silk strand around to catch their prey – fascinating spiders: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bolas_spider

    1. Hello Quint, thanks for getting in touch! This is a joro spider (Trichonephila clavata). A type of harmless orbweaver. It’s an Asian species that has been introduced to Georgia in 2014 and has been spreading quickly since then.

  67. Found a family of these in my garage about 10 or 11 of them various sizes. We are located in Yuma AZ close to the desert please help me identify this spider I have small children that I don’t want to get bit..

    1. Hello Marci, thanks for getting in touch! This is some type of mygalomorph spider. They are actually quite common but spend almost their entire life buried underground. Only during the mating season in late summer, the males emerge from their burrows in search of a female. This one is probably a folding-door spider of the genus Antrodiaetus.

  68. Hello D A, thanks for getting in touch! This is a male orbweaver, most likely a fierce orbweaver (Araneus saevus). They are not medically significant.

    1. Hello Nihme, thanks for getting in touch! This is a long-jawed orbweaver of the genus Tetragnatha. It’s not medically significant.

    1. Hello Tyler, thanks for getting in touch! This is a male orbweaver of the genus Araneus. Given the coloration and overall appearance, I am fairly certain that this is a fierce orbweaver (Araneus saevus)

  69. We found this spider near Williamsport, Pennsylvania. I can’t find a matching picture of it and am curious to what kind it is. Thanks!

    1. Hello Gina, thanks for getting in touch! This is an orbweaver in the genus Araneus – most likely a fierce orbweaver (Aaraneus saevus). It is of no medical concern for humans or pets.

  70. Saw this spider outside of Pittsburgh, but have had no luck in identifying it confidently. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.

  71. Hello,

    I was flipping rocks out in the Arizona desert today, near Apache Junction, and I found this unusual spider with incredibly long legs. Would anyone have an idea of what it is? I couldn’t get a better picture unfortunately. There was no web nearby, and he seemed quite capable on the ground.

    Thanks!

  72. To anyone who can help….
    I found this spider about a foot down in the dirt while digging a hole after a fairly good rain this weekend. I live in Watsonville, California.
    Now while this spider is quite large in size compared to most all spiders around here that would be seen in the wild and/or in your home, this is definitely not the biggest of this species I have seen. I have caught and released at least two or three others of this same exact species, solid in color, which is a very dark grey. Absolutely no hair on the body that I can tell, with very very little hair on the legs which I can only see zooming in with camera.
    Oh they are also VERY agressive, rearing up when in defense with the 4 front legs up in the air and big black fangs very visible. When holding a jar with one of these contained, it would pounce at the bottom of jar towards my hand with lightning speed.
    I don’t know if venomous or not, but even if it’s not, the bite looks like it would hurt very very badly. I really don’t think it’s a Tarantula but I could be wrong.
    Any help is appreciated, thank you!

  73. I feel badly that I took this spiders life, but I’ve never seen one like this, inside my house on the floor in the dark. The reddish tinge was the primary color, but also black and yellow- white in other body parts. It was larger in body size than what I’ve seen with the typical daddy long legs, the legs are curled up so hard to discern size but body is approx 1/2 “… any ideas of this spider is venomous!? Pics are of top and bottom of spider.

  74. Burbank, California. I found this very striking spider on an umbrella pole on my patio. This is just one day after I found what almost had to be a brown recluse in my bathroom, at least no other brown recluse look-alike I could find online looked more like my spider (from yesterday) than the brown recluse images. Today’s spider has a body just over half an inch long.

    1. Hello Gregg, thanks for getting in touch! The spider in the image is a harmless jumping spider, most likely Phidippus adumbratus: https://bugguide.net/node/view/26340
      Brown recluse spiders are not found in California. While there are several other Loxosceles sp. recluse spiders in California, they should not be found in California. Brown recluse findings in California usually turn out to be Titiotus sp. spiders: https://bugguide.net/node/view/84277/bgimage

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